Medical City Fort Worth September 19, 2016

Cardiologist Bruce Bowers, MD (third from left), with some Plaza Medical Center and Medical City Dallas cardiology team members at a recent Ground Rounds training session on TAVR, conducted at Plaza Medical Center.

In 2015, Medical City Fort Worth led the way as the first hospital in Tarrant County to offer the revolutionary transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure for patients with valvular heart disease. Now, Medical City Fort Worth's TAVR team is advancing its expertise with the addition of interventional cardiologist Bruce Bowers, MD, to the hospital’s structural heart program. Dr. Bowers is now performing TAVR procedures at Medical City Fort Worth and seeing patients at the hospital’s heart valve clinic in Fort Worth.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a minimally invasive procedure for select patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (narrowing of the aortic valve opening) who are not candidates for traditional open chest surgery. Each year, more than 200,000 Americans suffer with severe aortic stenosis. Without treatment, 50 percent of aortic stenosis patients who have symptoms will die within two years.

Dr. Bowers is the medical director of invasive/noninvasive cardiology and co-medical director of The Dallas Valve Institute at Medical City Fort Worth’s sister Medical City Healthcare hospital, Medical City Dallas. He is also the national director of interventional cardiology for Medical City Healthcare, the nation’s leading provider of healthcare services. In that position, Dr. Bowers oversees the interventional cardiology programs at 130 hospitals across the country. He was appointed to this prestigious leadership position because of his record of outstanding clinical outcomes in the most high risk patients and his commitment to high quality medicine.

“The addition of Dr. Bowers to our medical staff at Medical City Fort Worth is a great example of the expanded healthcare resources and expertise that we can offer our patients because we are part of Medical City Healthcare’ comprehensive healthcare system,” Medical City Fort Worth CEO Clay Franklin said. “Our patients on the west side of the Metroplex can now seek care from this nationally recognized cardiologist close to home, right here in Fort Worth.”

Dr. Bowers currently serves as the principal investigator for three TAVR clinical trials at Medical City Dallas, which outperformed the nation in the Sapien 3 TAVR trial. Overall, the results and outcomes demonstrated by Dr. Bowers and the Medical City team in that trial were the best of any of the 65 participating sites, with fewer complications and mortalities than any other site in the nation. Dr. Bowers has performed more than 700 minimally invasive valve replacements.

For more information about the TAVR procedure and Dr. Bowers at Medical City Fort Worth, contact the hospital’s structural heart valve clinic by calling 817-347-4935.

What is TAVR?
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a minimally invasive procedure for select patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (narrowing of the aortic valve opening) who are not candidates for traditional open chest surgery.

The surgical procedure repairs the valve without removing the old, damaged valve. Similar to a stent placed in an artery, the TAVR approach delivers a replacement valve through a catheter. Once the new valve is expanded, it takes over the job of regulating blood flow.

Usually, valve replacement requires an open heart procedure with a “sternotomy” in which the chest is surgically separated (open) for the procedure. The TAVR procedure can be done through very small openings that leave all the chest bones in place.

Currently, the procedure is reserved for patients for whom an open heart procedure is too risky. For this reason, most people who have this procedure are older and often have other medical conditions. TAVR can be an effective option to improve quality of life in patients who otherwise have limited choices for repair of their aortic valve.

Source: American Heart Association